Landscapes

The path before me titillates –
beckoning hues, rolling hills –
I set my lens on discovery.

My heart belongs to this land –
lush landscapes, and dynamic seasons –
here I’ll stay till shadows succumb to night.

(For Nancy Merrill’s A Photo a Week challenge: landscape.)

V.J.'s Weekly Challenge #82: whisper

I’m right behind you! The voice is whisper-scratchy, low and menacing.

I can see you! I whisper back, giving my voice a threatening tone.

The teacher strikes continue here and I am filling in for working parents. Granddaughter #1 and I are playing a game in which we think of normal sentences that are scary when whispered.

The concept of a whisper takes me back to my days as a Therapeutic Touch practitioner. Our co-founder and teacher, Delores Krieger, would remind us that a whisper is always better than a shout – to make our presence and our offerings subtle.

I remember applying that principle as a teacher – when the class would become unruly, instead of yelling, I’d whisper.

Where else, in my life, might a whisper be appropriate, I wonder? I invite you to ponder this along with me this week.

I’ll be following you. (Read with a whisper, lol.)

To participate, create a post on your own site, or leave a comment below. Either pingback – creating a link to this post – or drop your post’s url in the comments.

Look forward to your responses.

Don't Mind Her, She's a Regular.

So lost in conversation, my friend and I didn’t notice the time. The other patrons in the restaurant had long gone and the owners were cleaning up, ready to close.

“Oh my goodness!” my friend said, gathering her coat and purse. “I guess they want us to leave.”

We continued our conversation out the door and she walked me to my car. Making a new friend has been exhilarating. These lunch meetings have become a highlight in my month.

At three a.m. I wake up and realize we didn’t pay.

I forgot to pay my bill! I text my friend the next morning.

No problem, she responds. I’ve done that before too. Just drop in when you’re next in town and pay it then.

Ric and I decide to lunch in the same spot and confess my sin.

“You were here with Fay, right?” the owner asks.

I nod.

“I never worry about Fay,” she confides. “She’s a regular, and we love her here.”

“Did she pay yesterday?” I ask.

“No. She didn’t.”

So Ric squares up for all of us.

Apparently, being a regular has it’s advantages.

****

I’ve enjoyed the interpretations this week. Please visit those you’ve missed, and it’s never too late to join in.

Reena Saxena
Eugi’s Causerie
Sgeoil
parallax
Stine Writing
AWISEWOMANSJOURNEY
oneletterUP

See you tomorrow for a new challenge!

V.J.'s Weekly Challenge #81: regulars

The sound of oversized boots dragging across wooden floors announced that it was 2:40 p.m. Shuffles, as we called her, would arrive each day, walk to the back of the store where the cash desk was situated, touch three things, and then turn around and slump on to her next stop. She had a mop of tangled white blonde hair, a hawkish nose, and a lower lip that protruded, likely due to lack of teeth. She never said a word, and only occasionally, when I’d acknowledge her, would she make eye contact.

Al liked to show up early, and wait for me on the front porch. He’d have tea, just the way I liked it, and always a gleam in his eye that said he was ready to talk. As I opened the store he would find a chair and patiently bide his time. It was a copy of Rumi’s book of poetry that kept bringing this young man back. Seeing it on display, he felt certain, was a sign. Al had been a prisoner of an invading regime in the country he grew up in. Tortured and humiliated, he credits his survival to verses of Rumi written on the walls of his cell. Having escaped persecution, Al studied world religions, and started to write his own poetry. His passion for life, his eagerness to learn, and his endless tales enriched my days.

These were just two of many characters who frequented my inner city bookstore.

Those years are far behind, and ironically, Ric and I are now the regulars at a local diner – as at home with the wait staff as we are with the menus.

There is a kind of comfort in the familiarity of regulars.

***

Hope you have fun with this challenge. Looking forward to your responses.

To participate, create a post on your own site and link back here or drop a link to your post in the comments. All are welcome. This challenge lends itself to photography, writing, or music.